père-lachaise, montmartre & more // autumn in paris

It’s ridiculously easy to get to Paris from London. All you have to do is make it to St Pancras station, and three hours later, you’re at Gare du Nord in the centre of Paris, fumbling around for euros at the ticket machines. For that reason, I resisted going to Paris for a long time. It seemed ‘too easy’.

I was lucky enough that my parents prioritised travel over all else growing up, so it meant that I’ve traveled a lot more than other people my age. But our trips followed a formula, so to speak. We would always stay with family in the UK, and then take the Eurostar to Paris and hire a car from there to explore the rest of the continent. Paris was always a destination that we left almost as soon as we arrived there, so I was a little reluctant to go back when there were new places to explore instead.

However, I did eventually start to warm up to the idea. After all, people rave about Paris for a reason! When I found out that a friend of mine was going to be studying there for six months, I knew that it was a perfect opportunity to go back! It was horrendously difficult to narrow down to the photos I used in this blog post, that much I can say.

The trip worked out very cheaply too; many of the museums offer free entry on certain nights of the week, so I made sure to coordinate my trip around that! Versailles was free for me as well, as an EU resident under the age of 26 or so, so I also made sure to take advantage of that with my UK residency (while I still can…).

Paris has no shortage of beautiful architecture, and it’s not hard to imagine sitting outside with some fancy bread and cheese on one of the little balconies, listening to Françoise Hardy on an old record player. I can dream, can’t I?

I was lucky enough to see Notre-Dame before it burnt down. Ironically at the time I felt like I was going through the motions, because when we went inside there were so many people that you were forced to slowly shuffle through the aisles at a funeral pace, and the constant hum of conversation and obnoxious amateur photographers mostly drowned out any sense of awe from the building. Despite that, it’s such a beautiful building, and it’s impossible to fathom that people have been wandering around feeling the same things as me for centuries.

I wouldn’t be lying if I admitted that I timed my trip so that we could take advantage of the one night per week that the Louvre is free. I haven’t been to the Louvre since I was about nine, so it was amazing seeing all of these iconic paintings that I now recognise, especially after studying Art History at high school. I think I preferred the Musee d’Orsay though, despite it being smaller.

Crowded, but but no means a tourist trap!

Directionless travel is what I do best. It is one of the cities where you just have to get lost! Supplemented by Google Maps, of course. During my wanderings, I found the Marie Curie museum which was far more interesting than it appeared from its unassuming exterior. I’ve always been fascinated by the world that was still figuring out what they could do with radioactive materials – radioactive cigarettes were a feature!

It was lovely getting to see my friend again, although she did have classes for some of it. She had the kind of tiny Parisian studio apartment I’ve always dreamed of having. You had to climb a lot of very steep staircases to get there!

I do always enjoy the challenge of learning the basics of a foreign language, but I’ll admit I struggled quite a bit with my French pronunciation! Saying please and thank you is one thing, but I couldn’t even begin to correctly pronounce any of the place names around the city, much to my friend’s bemusement! After some practice, I think I managed to correctly pronounce ‘arrondismont’, which I was quite excited about.

A view from Sacré-Cœur.

I arrived just a week before Halloween, and although I’m not a big celebrator of that, we inadvertently planned our activities in a very seasonally appropriate way. One thing that I’ve wanted to check off my bucket list for as long as I can remember was the catacombs, which is a sprawling labyrinth underneath the streets of the city, decorated with human bones. Some of the bone arrangements were quite creative, too – in one section I even saw some human skulls arranged into the shape of a heart.

Père-Lachaise was a personal favourite destination of mine. I’ve always loved the melancholy atmosphere of cemeteries, and it was easy to see how this one in particular was the blueprint that inspired many places afterwards. Wandering the wide, cobblestoned paths in the autumn golden hour… it took your breath away. We finished that evening staying in, eating crepes and binge watching every single Halloween episode of Brooklyn 99, to continue with the Halloween theme.

It’s so ridiculously easy to find photographic inspiration in Paris, and I’m very much glad I could return as an adult and have the freedom to explore a little. I’m also extremely grateful to my friend for providing me the opportunity to stay with a local, as opposed to just staying in usual tourist accommodation. I always find that local accommodation is always so much more interesting when you get to see how people in the area really live.

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welsh cakes & ianto jones // a spontaneous day trip to cardiff

Last autumn, my friend and I decided that we would take a spontaneous day trip to Wales. True to our word, we were off the next morning. To this day, we still can’t quite believe that we had the nerve to do it. Spur-of-the-moment trips like this are a relatively common trope in young adult novels, but to be the instigator of one in real life was something else.

The tale begins at approximately 7pm on a Thursday evening, when my friend and I were innocuously chatting over Whatsapp. But when we noticed that we both had the next day off from work, we began to see an opportunity. We began searching the internet for offbeat ways to occupy our day in London; whether it be a pop-up art installation, or a cafe with a quirky interior.

But we weren’t sure if these places were enough. The places we were looking at were the kind of things that took a few hours at most to see, but this time we had the entire day. We had plenty of time to be a bit more adventurous, and we began to cast our sights outside of central London. Quick as a flash, the original plans to go to a cute cafe morphed into something far more intrepid.

The golden hour hits Cardiff Castle

I can’t remember who suggested it first, but eventually one of us brought up, shock horror, leaving the boundaries of the M25, the ring road that encircles London. Passing this milestone felt significant; our Friday plans were now officially a Day Out™. This new development didn’t slow us down down one jot, and we embraced the new opportunities by devouring every Top Ten London Day Trips list that we could lay our hands on.

One of the perks of being in London is how easy it is to escape London, with a wealth of easily accessible day trips that don’t require a car. Cambridge and Oxford came up many times, but we had both been to these cities already. Saint Albans, Canterbury and Rochester were other potential options. But it wasn’t until my friend suggested Wales as a joke that we had an option that truly sang to us.

The idea instantly caught. Although, even though it would be hilarious if we actually went to another country for a day trip, I knew it was totally unrealistic. It would be far too expensive… or would it? Because I am not the kind of person to leave things like that hanging, I decided to actually look at prices. And you know what? It wasn’t actually that much. It would only cost us about £27 or so for a round coach trip, which wasn’t even much more than the tickets to more nearby cities. And hey, go big or go home, right?

Thankfully, my friend is also of a similar disposition to me, and it didn’t take long for us to actually decide to go. We weren’t going to let this rare shared day off go to waste! Besides, I think we almost as excited about the idea of doing a day trip to another country than we were about the day trip itself.

And so, less than 12 hours after we first began planning, we found ourselves at London Victoria coach station, blearily clutching hot drinks from Pret aManger and ready to board a bus to Wales.

There are many accessible day-trips around London, many of which only being an hour or so away on the train. (Un)fortunately for us, Cardiff is not one of these cities. The coach from Victoria Coach Station departed at 7am and arrived no less than four and a half hours later, just in time for lunchtime. But in the end, the timing worked out quite well. By the time we were due for our bus home at 6pm, we were sufficiently exhausted enough to not care about ignoring any places of interest that we might have missed.

Cardiff has always been one of these cities I had been meaning to go to one day. Accessible enough to be vaguely realistic, but far enough out of the way that it was always dismissed to the back of the line. On many accounts, it was reported to be a lovely little city. For me personally, there was also an attraction in that the city played a big part in Doctor Who and Torchwood, both beloved shows of my high school self. Plus, I’m a sucker for a new experience, and what better place to experience that than the Welsh capital?

Welsh Cakes – my friend insisted a trip to Wales was not complete without these. 10 for £2.90? Don’t mind if we do!

My friend, being Welsh, had of course been several times before. She was my tour guide! Not that we had a proper plan, really. We just wandered around, stumbling across food markets and strange Harry Potter knick knacks in stores. There’s some gorgeous shopping arcades dotted across the city, and we took great delight in admiring every inch of them!

We found the Ianto Jones shrine, which was a huge throwback to my Torchwood days. It was a little strange seeing a full blown memorial for a fictional character, but hey, what’s a fandom if it doesn’t make you feel things?

Despite Ianto Jones not actually being a real person, I still couldn’t help but feel a pang of sadness when I saw how neglected some of the posters were, with years of being left to the elements stripping the colours and curling the corners. Torchwood has been off the air for years now, and there aren’t a lot of new memorials going up these days. At one point, all of these people thought Torchwood important enough to make a pilgrimage to Cardiff, but now Torchwood is no longer a part of their lives, and these people have moved on. I feel old.

We spent quite a lot of time around the harbour front, which alternated between gale-force winds and cool and clear sunshine. At one point we were forced to retreat inside the nearest pub to escape the rain and wind, which was threatening to blind us with its wrath. The pub in question was an ever-dependable Wetherspoons, but it did offer us a lovely view over the harbour! Half an hour later, the sky was blue and the sun was shining. Ah, the joys of British weather.

On a whim, we decided to pop into the interactive science centre, which was actually a lot of fun. We spent a good few hours channelling our inner children and messing around with the exhibits pretending to be airbenders.

After living in London for nearly two years, I had almost forgotten that people are capable of talking to strangers unprompted. Despite having the technical definition of a city, Cardiff really did give off some small town vibes. Everyone was smiling, and I even found my usually shy self chatting to a few people. A young mother with her toddler at the station even offered a ride back to the station if we didn’t want to walk it.

Of course, that doesn’t mean you necessarily want every conversation that comes your way. One memorable moment was in a souvenir shop, where we were treated to a conversation with the shopkeeper that rapidly the devolved into a woe-is-me rant about how his wife left him for his boss. But really, even an awkward encounter like that was just something to giggle over later.

One thing I was most excited to see was the bilingual signs, with many places displaying both English and Welsh languages. I myself am a firm advocate of New Zealand doing the same with Māori and English, so I was delighted to see a country, similar to NZ in so many ways, still representing its indigenous language today.

Usually the excitement of booking a trip becomes dulled down after the weeks or months of anticipation, but in the case of this particular trip to Wales, I found that there was no time for this to happen. Because we had so little time to mentally prepare ourselves to go, I actually found myself more excited to go here than I had been for a trip in a long time.

It’s become a fond memory now, and I can still barely believe that I’ve managed to find friends who is equally enthusiastic about spontaneous explorations. Here’s to many more such adventures!

whitby: a day on the yorkshire coast

While staying with some Yorkshire relatives this week, we decided to take a day trip out to Whitby, a seaside town famous for Dracula and Captain Cook. I have a real soft spot for this town. I’ve only been here a few times, but whenever I come back I’m filled with nostalgia. I came here as a child with the aforementioned relatives, and I have memories of eating fish and chips and playing with 2p coins in the amusement arcades.

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Bram Stoker took most of his inspiration for Dracula from this striking seaside settlement, and you can easily see why. With its sleepy harbour, moody grey clouds and dramatic cliffs, it’s basically a recipe for a great story. Also, Captain Cook reportedly learnt most of his sea craft here as a youngster before his later voyage to settle New Zealand, so that’s pretty cool.

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I came here once in summer, and Whitby was right in the middle of a Goth Weekend, which meant that the town was absolutely packed! It was quite a cool time to visit, seeing people wearing goth fashion wandered the streets, weaving in between the ordinary tourists dressed like a generic H&M advert. It was a glorious juxtaposition. Today though, the streets were empty.

Let’s set the scene: the sun was beginning to set, and the Christmas lights were starting to switch on. There was a grey and stormy sky, and and the remnants of the wet morning provided a muted reflection of the sunset on the pavements. The streets were just how I like them; all higgledy piggledy, with messy, alternating shopfronts and colours.

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There were so many cute looking shops around here! If I had the time and money, I would have spent all day inside them. Alas, I could only enjoy from the outside. The people in this town certainly know how to coordinate a shop display.

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After wandering through the cobblestones of the town centre, we had lunch inside a lovely cafe called the Monks Haven, because of course it was. I had fish pie, because a trip to the seaside is not complete without some form of fish in a meal! I didn’t take photos inside because our food was distractingly good, but the interior was very nice.

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We climbed the 199 steps to the Abbey, which is situated on a dramatic clifftop perch, overlooking the entire coast. With it’s weathered gravestones and ruined silhouette, you can easily see why Bram Stoker was inspired by this image. The views from the climb were stunning.

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From the bottom of the steps.

Following the climb, we headed off to the beach for a quick wander. I spent my entire childhood living next to the ocean (although ironically, I never went), but I’ve only seen the sea a handful of times since moving to London. I really miss it. To stand there, on that English coast, just for a moment, was amazing.

The sand was getting all over my boots, and the dying pastel hues of the sun were reflected in the waves. Seagulls flew overhead, and the water stretched as far as I could see. I just stood there for a bit, feeling the cool winter wind on my face and gazing out into the Yorkshire sea.

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It was a long drive back to my relative’s place. We were all exhausted from our long day out, and my headphones provided a soundtrack to the drive as I leaned on the window, staring up at the stars over the bleak moors. It was a good day.

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Whitby is of my favourite places in this country, and I don’t think that its just the nostalgia talking. It’s a lovely town, with friendly people who also happen to have excellent taste in decorating. If I had more time I would have delved more into the historical background of this town, but I know I’ll be back at some point! If you ever get a chance to visit Yorkshire, I highly recommend coming over to the east coast and spending some time in Whitby.

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battersea park & riverfront views

Although most people will only know it for the iconic power station of the same name, Battersea is home to a sprawling park with much to offer its patrons. It was actually much bigger than I had previously expected, and despite being only 3 kilometres upstream from the bustle of the Houses of Parliament and Big Ben, it had a certain serenity that made it seem worlds away.

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Battersea Park certainly had no shortage of points of interest. The first one I came across was a massive boating lake, with lovely reflections of the autumn foliage and lots of dangerous looking swans prowling around the edges. These gangsters.

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There was a photo opportunity at nearly every corner, and I wasted no time in taking advantage of that! This park works best when you’re just mindlessly wandering through it.

I found one area with a beautiful old bandstand, surrounded by a quiet circle of leaves strewn across wooden benches. I took this chance to stop and sit down for a little, and just enjoy the moment. Then I got cold and had to stand up and start moving again, as silly me had not yet allowed herself to believe that summer is over and was not dressed appropriately. Hmmph.

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I even came across a sub-tropical garden, which featured exotic plants from across the world, including some Flax from New Zealand. I remember my family spending ages trying to get rid of flax in our garden back home in New Zealand, so it made me chuckle that someone would willingly plant it somewhere else!

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As I wandered northwards towards the river, I came across some beautiful botanical gardens. A signpost helpfully informed me that these gardens were purpose built in the 1950s for the ‘Festival of Britain’. While most of the attractions of the event didn’t survive the decades, the grand vision of the past still exists in some lovely water features and mid-century architecture. To my delight, the golden hour was upon me, and it made for some beautiful photos.

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To get back home, instead of walking back through the park to where I arrived at, I decided to take the route that took me across the river to Sloane Square station, north of the park. It worked out much better actually, as I got to see an entirely different side to the Thames river!

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Seeing the old townhouses across the river almost made me feel like I was in some other European city or something. Its hard to believe that this peaceful riverside walk eventually gives way to the bustling South Bank of London! This part of the park is also home to the London Peace Pagoda, which cuts a particularly impressive sight.

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The Peace Pagoda.

The stations in its immediate vicinity are not part of London’s tube network, so it can be a bit of a pain getting there, which is a let down for its otherwise potentially high rating. That being said, Sloane Square (which is on the District/Circle line) is only a 10-20 minute walk from the park, which also includes sections walking along the picturesque riverbank, so its not all bad! If you’re ever in the area, Battersea Park is a lovely day out with lots to see and do.

Final rating: 7.5/10

Nearest stations: Battersea Park or Queenstown Road (National Rail). Zone 2. Sloane Square (District/Circle). Zone 1.

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impressions of oxford

It’s hard to describe exactly what makes Oxford, England so great. Perhaps it’s the obvious sense of history and sense of curiosity exuding from the gaps between the well-worn flagstones, or perhaps it’s just the small things. Flowers spilling out over bicycle baskets, books haphazardly piled along window sills, reflections of the past in store windows.  It’s just as much about the little things as it is about the obvious, big historical attractions.

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I have been there on two separate occasions; once in a rainy spring day in May, and another in a mild autumn day a few weeks ago. I don’t think it matters what the weather is when you visit though; Oxford’s appeal is not consigned to one particular climate. Here are some photos I’ve taken during my two visits.

 

 

I’m not a particularly studious person, but it is difficult to avoid the gentle influence that Oxford University has had over this city for so many centuries. I’ll be honest – if I had to describe my ideal student life it would be in Oxford! I almost could have imagined myself trawling through one of the bookstores looking for an obscure volume, curled up in a coffee shop with my laptop, or studying with friends in the wide lawns of the colleges. Or to be more realistic, running through bucketloads of tourists in the cobblestoned streets because I slept in and don’t want to be late to my class. Dreams need a bit of a reality check sometimes as well, don’t they? I’m almost jealous of the students studying there. Academic results aside, you can easily see why Oxford is one of the most prestigious universities in the world!

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Oxford has a certain timeless feel to it. Sometimes it feels like any modern urban centre, and other times you could have stumbled into the mediaeval times. Students tap away at their MacBook keyboards with their headphones in, but then sometimes you will stumble into a deserted street and it will strike you that this street probably hasn’t changed in centuries.

 

 

Oxford is also home to one of my favourite museums, the Pitt Rivers/Oxford Natural History museum. It’s got an amazing collection related to anthropology, and it’s situated in a gorgeous Victorian building. I’ll write a more detailed post about the museum soon!

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Oxford is barely an hour away from London on the train, and a return day fare from London is only £26.00 (or less if you have a railcard!) which isn’t too bad as rail fares go. If you buy in advance you can get return fares for just over £10 too! You can walk literally everywhere in Oxford too, so there’s no need to worry about getting around once you’re there. So, if you are ever in London and feel like taking a day away from the city’s hustle and bustle, maybe you’ll consider Oxford.

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This is something a little different for me, so I hope it turned out okay. Thanks for reading, and I hope you liked my photos.

hampstead hill gardens

The Hampstead Hill Gardens quite easily make my short list of London attractions. Hardly anyone seems to even know about it, and that’s all part of its charm. When you first enter the sanctuary with flowers and vines twisting over marble pillars you could be forgiven for thinking that you’ve stumbled into an enchanted garden from a fairytale.

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SEE WHAT I MEAN ABOUT A SECRET GARDEN?

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The gardens are the public part of a large estate, which is still inhabited today. They date back to the early 1900s, where they were a prime location for evening strolls and showing off to others at Edwardian garden parties. The most interesting thing about these gardens though, is that back when they were constructing them, due to the time period they obviously had no large trucks or heavy machinery to transport the dirt for landscaping, which made things difficult. However, conveniently enough, the Northern line tube extension was underway very close by. They needed somewhere to put all of that dirt from the tunnelling, and guess what it was used for! The contractors were so desperate to get rid of the dirt that they actually paid the the garden builders to take in the dirt. Public transport really shaped this city, even in the most unlikely of ways!IMG_1345

When I purchased my first DSLR I knew this was the place to practice my photography, which is why the photos in this article are so much better than all of my other ones! Honestly, this place is ridiculously photogenic. There’s an endless array of interesting angles, shadows and perspectives to play around with, it’s such fun!DSC_0154DSC_0119

However, it’s otherwise high rating is let down by it being a bit of a walk from the station. Sure, you could take the bus directly there, but that’s such a hassle. I jest. It’s actually a very pleasant and quiet ride/walk through the leafy suburbs/forests of north London, and it’s well worth the extra effort! You can either walk/ride the bus through the leafy and village-like suburbs of north London from Hampstead station, or take the overground to Hampstead Heath and take a lovely stroll through the park of the same name.

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The contrast in colours is beautiful here.

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The view over the trees.

Final rating: 8.5/10

Nearest station: Hampstead (Northern Line) – Zone 2

Thanks to the historical background from: https://www.cityoflondon.gov.uk/things-to-do/green-spaces/hampstead-heath/heritage/Pages/the-pergola.aspx

abney park cemetery

Just a few minutes off the busy Stoke Newington High Street, you will find yourself in the cavernous Abney Park Cemetery. Melancholy is the word that immediately springs to mind when you walk in here. You can’t help but feel like you’ve stepped into a storybook. This is one of my favourite places to visit when I want to just think in silence.

Every time I’ve visited I’ve been pretty much the only one there, so it’s actually quite eerie in a way. Abney Park has a timeless feel to it; save for the occasional plane flying overhead you could be just about anywhere, or anytime. I don’t know, maybe I’m just being a romantic, but you can’t help but feel that you’re the first person to discover this place.

This cemetery was built during the industrial revolution to deal with the quickly rising city population, but after it reached capacity it was left completely untouched. Decades of neglect have resulted in today’s cemetery/nature reserve, which is totally overgrown with greenery. Branches and leaves snake over the tombstones and many have disappeared into the undergrowth completely. It’s got quite a fascinating history actually, but I won’t get into it here, it’ll take too long! I highly recommend looking it up though.

It’s not too far out, with a location on the edge of Zone 2, and it’s only a short walk from Stoke Newington station. If you don’t have an connection to this particular Overground line you can change at Hackney Central or Seven Sisters, so it’s quite well connected. The rest of Stoke Newington is a quite nice area as well, with a rather village-like atmosphere despite its its close proximity to the A10.

Final rating: 8/10

Nearest Station: Stoke Newington (overground). Zone 2

Limehouse Basin

After admiring the view of the Limehouse Basin and its pretty canalboats for months after passing over it on the DLR, I finally decided to get off a few stops early and check it out. I’ve on occasion cycled through this area on my way to work as well, and it was just as enjoyable this way. I will maintain, aside from the Embankment cycle route which will always take the crown (it’s very hard to compete with the Houses of Parliament), this is my favourite route to cycle in the city. The lovely new East-West cycle superhighway runs right through this area, and it’s fully segregated from the road with separate traffic lights, etc just for cyclists.

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Viewing the basin from on board the DLR.

Bikes can move through congested areas much quicker than cars can, so it’s a smooth, uninterrupted journey. It’s so easy and effortless, that sometimes I can even pretend I’m in the Netherlands or something. Props to TFL for creating this route!

When you approach the Limehouse basin, you get the combined view of the impressive towers of Canary Wharf blocking out the sun, and the peaceful narrowboats in the foreground. Even just being a pedestrian is very nice, as it’s a very peaceful area.IMG_9833

It couldn’t be closer to the DLR station(s), and once you leave the stop you’ll find yourself free to wander the perimeter of the basin and admire the colourful boats. There’s some spots where you can look out onto the Thames as well, and take in the quieter side of the iconic river.

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The bank of the Thames.

This area has a very local feel to it, as unless they’re passing through on their bicycles, it’s mostly just residents enjoying the waterfront. I currently work near Canary Wharf, so sometimes I’ll go for a little walk around here before I start work which is really lovely. Personally I like to walk around to the other side where there is a small adjoining park called Ropemakers Fields, and from there on it’s only a 7 or so minute walk to the next station along, Westferry where I can continue my journey.

A spot of calm off Commercial Road, very well linked with the DLR running parallel to it, or a 15 minute cycle from Tower Hill.

Final rating: 7/10

Nearest Station: Limehouse (DLR, National Rail). Zone 2.

Lloyd Park

I’ll be honest, I mostly came down here because I wanted to ride the mythical London tram system. And that I did. It was a just like a train, except we got caught in traffic jams. Very exciting. There was a stop (or is it station?) right outside the park as well, conveniently enough. The park was lovely too, so it was two birds with one stone! If you don’t take that tram though, it’s a relatively straightforward 20 minute walk from the Croydon centre.

There was this fairground thing when I went, but I’m more of a nature gal’ so I kind of just ignored it and went straight into the woody growth behind it. There was quite a big field which would be useful for a casual game of football I imagine, but there were also quite a lot of wild grasslands that gave you that countryside feel.

It was a bit hilly by London’s standard’s, which means there were mild inclines that made me embarrassingly out of breath. That being said, at this point you’re basically in Surrey anyway so a bit of rolling landscapes is understandable.

It was a lovely park, but probably not worth making the trek all of the way from North London if you aren’t local to the area (unless you, like me, are a fan of the Croydon trams). Of course, if you’re anywhere near South East London and you want a countryside escape that’s not actually in the countryside, it’s a great spot to visit! I didn’t get all of the way in, but it seemed quite big, with plenty of parts to explore.

Final rating: 6.5/10

Nearest station: Lloyd Park, London Trams, or East Croydon, National Rail

Clapham Common

This park was so much bigger than I initially thought it was! At first I just saw a lovely, but not particularly noteworthy green space. It seemed a bit smaller than I was expecting, but lo and behold, I changed direction and crossed a corner, and all of a sudden it was huge! It had all of the usual features of a park, except it was all relatively  spread out because the park was so big. There were children playing football in the fields, and I walked past a lovely pond where some people were fishing. There was a bandstand which was really lovely too, you don’t see too many of these around nowadays!

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I saw lots of people using this park as a cyclist through-fare on their way home from work too, which I always love seeing! It just goes to show how London is becoming greener every day.

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London cyclists in the park.

There’s quite a few busy roads criss-crossing through the park which you have no choice but to cross, which unfortunately can ruin the vibe of the otherwise peaceful urban stroll. Ah well, you can’t have everything! Luckily enough, the park is big enough so that once you’re away from the roads you can forget about them. It’s insanely well-linked transport-wise too, with the northern line serving stations at both the north and south ends of the park. There are plenty of normal shops, pubs and cute cafes at either end as well which can provide a great introduction back into the city life once you’re done!

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Worth mentioning that the tube station here is one of two on the entire tube network that has these tiny island platforms. Presumably they don’t have the space to widen the tunnels, so you’re left with these questionably small platforms…

Mind the gap!

Final rating: 7/10

Nearest Station: Clapham Common (Northern Line). Zone 2.

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Pretty reflections in the water!