whitby: a day on the yorkshire coast

While staying with some Yorkshire relatives this week, we decided to take a day trip out to Whitby, a seaside town famous for Dracula and Captain Cook. I have a real soft spot for this town. I’ve only been here a few times, but whenever I come back I’m filled with nostalgia. I came here as a child with the aforementioned relatives, and I have memories of eating fish and chips and playing with 2p coins in the amusement arcades.

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Bram Stoker took most of his inspiration for Dracula from this striking seaside settlement, and you can easily see why. With its sleepy harbour, moody grey clouds and dramatic cliffs, it’s basically a recipe for a great story. Also, Captain Cook reportedly learnt most of his sea craft here as a youngster before his later voyage to settle New Zealand, so that’s pretty cool.

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I came here once in summer, and Whitby was right in the middle of a Goth Weekend, which meant that the town was absolutely packed! It was quite a cool time to visit, seeing people wearing goth fashion wandered the streets, weaving in between the ordinary tourists dressed like a generic H&M advert. It was a glorious juxtaposition. Today though, the streets were empty.

Let’s set the scene: the sun was beginning to set, and the Christmas lights were starting to switch on. There was a grey and stormy sky, and and the remnants of the wet morning provided a muted reflection of the sunset on the pavements. The streets were just how I like them; all higgledy piggledy, with messy, alternating shopfronts and colours.

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There were so many cute looking shops around here! If I had the time and money, I would have spent all day inside them. Alas, I could only enjoy from the outside. The people in this town certainly know how to coordinate a shop display.

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After wandering through the cobblestones of the town centre, we had lunch inside a lovely cafe called the Monks Haven, because of course it was. I had fish pie, because a trip to the seaside is not complete without some form of fish in a meal! I didn’t take photos inside because our food was distractingly good, but the interior was very nice.

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We climbed the 199 steps to the Abbey, which is situated on a dramatic clifftop perch, overlooking the entire coast. With it’s weathered gravestones and ruined silhouette, you can easily see why Bram Stoker was inspired by this image. The views from the climb were stunning.

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From the bottom of the steps.

Following the climb, we headed off to the beach for a quick wander. I spent my entire childhood living next to the ocean (although ironically, I never went), but I’ve only seen the sea a handful of times since moving to London. I really miss it. To stand there, on that English coast, just for a moment, was amazing.

The sand was getting all over my boots, and the dying pastel hues of the sun were reflected in the waves. Seagulls flew overhead, and the water stretched as far as I could see. I just stood there for a bit, feeling the cool winter wind on my face and gazing out into the Yorkshire sea.

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It was a long drive back to my relative’s place. We were all exhausted from our long day out, and my headphones provided a soundtrack to the drive as I leaned on the window, staring up at the stars over the bleak moors. It was a good day.

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Whitby is of my favourite places in this country, and I don’t think that its just the nostalgia talking. It’s a lovely town, with friendly people who also happen to have excellent taste in decorating. If I had more time I would have delved more into the historical background of this town, but I know I’ll be back at some point! If you ever get a chance to visit Yorkshire, I highly recommend coming over to the east coast and spending some time in Whitby.

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impressions of oxford

It’s hard to describe exactly what makes Oxford, England so great. Perhaps it’s the obvious sense of history and sense of curiosity exuding from the gaps between the well-worn flagstones, or perhaps it’s just the small things. Flowers spilling out over bicycle baskets, books haphazardly piled along window sills, reflections of the past in store windows.  It’s just as much about the little things as it is about the obvious, big historical attractions.

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I have been there on two separate occasions; once in a rainy spring day in May, and another in a mild autumn day a few weeks ago. I don’t think it matters what the weather is when you visit though; Oxford’s appeal is not consigned to one particular climate. Here are some photos I’ve taken during my two visits.

 

 

I’m not a particularly studious person, but it is difficult to avoid the gentle influence that Oxford University has had over this city for so many centuries. I’ll be honest – if I had to describe my ideal student life it would be in Oxford! I almost could have imagined myself trawling through one of the bookstores looking for an obscure volume, curled up in a coffee shop with my laptop, or studying with friends in the wide lawns of the colleges. Or to be more realistic, running through bucketloads of tourists in the cobblestoned streets because I slept in and don’t want to be late to my class. Dreams need a bit of a reality check sometimes as well, don’t they? I’m almost jealous of the students studying there. Academic results aside, you can easily see why Oxford is one of the most prestigious universities in the world!

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Oxford has a certain timeless feel to it. Sometimes it feels like any modern urban centre, and other times you could have stumbled into the mediaeval times. Students tap away at their MacBook keyboards with their headphones in, but then sometimes you will stumble into a deserted street and it will strike you that this street probably hasn’t changed in centuries.

 

 

Oxford is also home to one of my favourite museums, the Pitt Rivers/Oxford Natural History museum. It’s got an amazing collection related to anthropology, and it’s situated in a gorgeous Victorian building. I’ll write a more detailed post about the museum soon!

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Oxford is barely an hour away from London on the train, and a return day fare from London is only £26.00 (or less if you have a railcard!) which isn’t too bad as rail fares go. If you buy in advance you can get return fares for just over £10 too! You can walk literally everywhere in Oxford too, so there’s no need to worry about getting around once you’re there. So, if you are ever in London and feel like taking a day away from the city’s hustle and bustle, maybe you’ll consider Oxford.

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This is something a little different for me, so I hope it turned out okay. Thanks for reading, and I hope you liked my photos.