chingford // epping forest

Disclaimer: I got a little lost here. That was okay though, because I still had 4G signal, so Google Maps was always comfortably in the back of my mind if worst came to worst.

Actually, I’m not even sure if I’d go as far to say that I was lost, per say. It was more like I knew what direction I came from and where the exit was, I just wasn’t on a Official Path. So this was an organised form of being lost.

Folks, this is the story of an adventure in Epping Forest.

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Epping Forest is a massive, 2,400ha swath of woodland, located on the northern side of London. There’s been evidence to suggest that this area has been continuously wooded since the late stone ages, and it’s uncultivated nature has been a source of local interest for just about as long. The infamous ‘black knight’ scene in Monty Python and the Holy Grail was even filmed inside, which I was quite delighted to learn! Epping Forest is so vast that it technically encompasses a few train stops, but for today, I visited the Chingford section.

Chingford is quite a fun word to say, and for a long while I only recognised the name as the northern terminus of one of the several Overground lines. A yet, a mere 5 minutes from the station, you could be forgiven for thinking that you’re in the middle of nowhere quite quickly. It’s autumn now, so I was greeted by orange and red hues in every direction. It was very peaceful. Epping has that almost magical feeling, where you feel like anything could happen. The only reminder of civilisation is the faint chatter of people and dogs barking, and you can go several minutes without seeing a soul. It’s easy to see why centuries worth of creatives have found their muse in these paths.

There’s also an excellent example of Tudor timber-framed architecture in Queen Elizabeth’s hunting lodge, a bespoke building by Henry VIII. It’s quite close to the edge of the forest, and it cuts quite an picturesque image at its hilltop perch. It wasn’t hard to imagine the pompous and frilly nobles of the day enjoying a lavish feast, looking out through the iron windowpanes towards the plains. It’s rare to see this kind of architecture this close to London, so for someone who came with literally no other expectations of the area beyond the fact that ‘Epping Forest is supposed to be quite nice’, seeing some Tudor design was quite exciting!

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Not real deer, of course!

 

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View from the hunting lodge.

 

Epping Forest is absolute massive, and it’s formidable 2,400ha means that there’s several different ways to get there. Obviously today I entered via Chingford, but the Central Line runs along the perimeter as well, which gives you an alternate route if the overground isn’t that accessible.

On a nice day I could easily imagine bringing a picnic here to enjoy, and on a more overcast day like when I went, it was just nice to explore the atmosphere. Epping Forest is well worth seeing if you ever need an escape into nature from the city! There’s a varied enough landscape that you’ll be entertained for hours. I know I’ll definitely be coming back often.

Final rating: 9/10

Nearest station: Chingford (London Overground). Zone 5.

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